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Weekly Wrap Up

Weekly Wrap Up

  1. Judge Tannous faces lawsuits for going after Salameh.
 
 
 
 
 
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Judge Jean Tannous was notified verbally of a request to halt his investigations into the accounts of BDL Governor Riad Salameh and his brother Raja in the “Swiss Transfers” case. Tannous had requested that numerous banks provide him with information on accounts associated with the Salameh brothers. Former minister Rashid Derbas, Bank Med’s counsel, saw this as a serious judicial blunder because the judge’s order violates banking confidentiality.

Derbas’ allegations, however, were refuted by the Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary, which stated that “the Public Prosecution or any competent judicial authority has the right to bypass banking secrecy in cases of illegal enrichment based on Article 7 of the Banking Secrecy Law.”

Derbas filed a complaint against the state on Tuesday in connection with Tannous’ case. Filing litigation and challenging the state has become the preferred method of avoiding the judiciary in 2021.

  1. BDL is demanding fuel importing companies to pay 10% of imported gasoline in fresh dollars, which may cause in a new fuel crisis. 
 
 
 
 
 
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The decision of the Banque du Liban is generating turmoil in gasoline pricing, pushing fuel importing businesses to progressively stop delivering to outlets. The Energy Ministry publishes weekly gasoline price lists, whereas the rate of new dollars swings on a daily basis on the parallel market.

The ruling largely relates rises in fuel prices to changes in the currency rate. Previously, dollars traded to importers via the BDL platform helped to mitigate the rise in gasoline costs when the parallel market exchange rate grew.

Fuel importers are expected to turn to the parallel market to obtain the dollars required to achieve the 10% specified in the BDL judgment.

  1. Kuwait halts issuing visas for Lebanese citizens. https://www.instagram.com/p/CWGCBPDqNbv/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
 
 
 
 
 
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Kuwait’s move is in response to the recent diplomatic crisis between Lebanon and Gulf states, according to Kuwaiti daily Al-Qabas. Those with Kuwaiti residency, on the other hand, are not included in the measure.

  1. ISF General Imad Osman refused to execute absentia arrest warrant against former minister Ali Hassan Khalil
 
 
 
 
 
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Major General Imad Osman, the head of the Internal Security Forces, declined to carry out the in-absentia arrest order issued against former minister and MP Ali Hassan Khalil in the port explosion case. Osman explained his action by stating that he had made a request for clarification to the Attorney General of the Judicial Council under Article 40 of the Constitution, which states that an MP cannot be imprisoned when Parliament is in session without the agreement of the Judicial Council. However, Article 97 of the Parliament Law makes it plain that prosecuting MPs called before Parliament is in session is permissible “without the need to seek approval from the Chamber.”

  1. Comedian Hussein Kaouk subject to hate and intimidation campaign.

Hussein Kaouk, an actor and comedian, is facing a hate and intimidation campaign on social media from pro-Hezbollah organizations after being accused of spearheading a “smear campaign” against “the resistance community” in a piece published on Friday in Al Akhbar newspaper.

In his spoof program “Shou l Wade3” (What’s up) on Al Jadded, Kaouk ridiculed all Lebanese parties and their fans, and mocked the fact that Hezbollah supporters were paid in dollars.

Kaouk and his partner director Mohammad Dayekh have acquired attention on social media platforms for their quick cartoons depicting the poor living circumstances of inhabitants of Beirut’s Southern region.

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